That “Skinny” Dress In Your Closet, or Hopeful Hoarding

red dress with black beltIf you’ve never gained, then lost (then regained) weight, this metaphor may be meaningless to you. If you have gone through that experience, you’re probably familiar with holding on to an item of clothing that no longer fits, but you hold on to it because “It might fit again someday if I go on a diet/eat healthier/work out more.”

That’s what this blog has become.

I’ve been blogging across several different domains, across multiple platforms in some form or fashion since 1993. There are people who follow me on Twitter who weren’t even alive when I wrote my first blog post. And to spare you my middle-aged reflections about how things were so different back in the early days of blogging, I’ll simply say that my attention span, willingness to write, elevated professional profile, and fear of writing something that might run afoul of work supervisors doesn’t really make it seem worthwhile anymore. Still, I held on to this domain and to my web hosting the way I held on to that skinny dress at the back of my closet. It’s probably crumpled on the floor, buried under a mountain of other stuff by now, but I know it’s there, and it nags at me.

I think the time has come to throw this dress away.

Langston Hughes: The Black Man Speaks

I swear to the Lord
I still can’t see
Why Democracy means
Everybody but me.

“The Black Man Speaks” from Jim Crow’s Last Stand (Worldcat)

To say I’ve been feeling this acutely over the last few weeks is an understatement. I honestly think I’ve felt this way almost as long as I’ve been alive, but the feelings grow sharper the longer I live in Vancouver.

Today is Langston Hughes’ birthday. Hughes has long been one of my favourite poets/cultural critics, though I feel like he’s fallen out of favour a little over the last 20 years or so. Though he is better known as a poet, his essay “The Negro Artist and the Racial Mountain” has been a source of inspiration for me, more so when I was a young African American Studies scholar who was trying to balance claiming my place in the Black community with my feminist leanings and my queer identity.

If you find yourself in a despairing place, read a little Langston Hughes today.

After the Love Has Gone

I’m Cecily, I’m a librarian, and I’ve come to hate reading.

That’s not exactly true — my (barely) managed depression and (increased) anxiety have robbed me of the ability to process anything more than tweets, Facebook posts from the Hobonichi group, and texts from loved ones. Losing myself in novels and non-fiction is where I found comfort for so many years, but now it only adds to my already out-of-control anxiety and self-doubt.

I’ve found other pursuits in the meantime, like drawing and writing in my journal, but I miss the immersive experience of floating within a well-crafted story. Has this ever happened to you? What did you do to get back to reading?

My Distraction Sickness

Andrew Sullivan’s essay for New York Magazine seems especially timely, given that a few of my friends are taking hiatuses from social media at present.

I was, in other words, a very early adopter of what we might now call living-in-the-web. And as the years went by, I realized I was no longer alone. Facebook soon gave everyone the equivalent of their own blog and their own audience. More and more people got a smartphone — connecting them instantly to a deluge of febrile content, forcing them to cull and absorb and assimilate the online torrent as relentlessly as I had once. Twitter emerged as a form of instant blogging of microthoughts. Users were as addicted to the feedback as I had long been — and even more prolific. Then the apps descended, like the rain, to inundate what was left of our free time. It was ubiquitous now, this virtual living, this never-stopping, this always-updating. I remember when I decided to raise the ante on my blog in 2007 and update every half-hour or so, and my editor looked at me as if I were insane. But the insanity was now banality; the once-unimaginable pace of the professional blogger was now the default for everyone.

This has been my reality for so long, I’m honestly not sure if I can imagine living any other way. I justify it by saying it helps me keep in touch with friends far and wide, but how in touch am I, really, when the majority of my updates come through the firehose of my Twitter timeline and are condensed to 140 characters?


A former romantic partner used to have a very active, very rich social circle that he kept in constant touch with through his laptop (and his phone, to a smaller extent). When I’d visit him in the Bay Area, his laptop was a third party in our bed. And I never felt like I could ask him to only focus on me, because those other people in his life were important too. What I eventually realized is that by taking advantage of the very limited time I had to spend with him and giving it to other people, he was showing me in no uncertain terms that I didn’t really matter at all.1 It’s now why I insist that current romantic partners put their phones away and silence any notifications while we’re together. As Sullivan writes:

Truly being with another person means being experientially with them, picking up countless tiny signals from the eyes and voice and body language and context, and reacting, often unconsciously, to every nuance. These are our deepest social skills, which have been honed through the aeons. They are what make us distinctively human.

I don’t know that I’ll ever be able to fully unplug. I want to get to a place where I can at least read quietly again, without sharing what I’m feeling at every moment with the ever-present dopamine injection that is my list of Twitter followers and Facebook friends. I want to hold hands, feel skin against skin, notice the way someone’s forehead furrows, and the way their eyes sparkle with laughter. But how can I do that in an unmediated way without being independently wealthy? But the distractions of my online life aren’t doing me any favours personally or professionally, and I think I could benefit greatly from sitting with the discomfort of quiet long enough for it to start to fit like a well-loved pair of slippers.


  1. I’m no saint here, either. The time I should’ve been spending with my spouse, I was spending it on the long-distance relationship and throwing my energies there. We live, we learn. 

Sunday Links

Shopping

Reading

  • Recommendations for Polyamory in Fiction – a fantastic place to start for anyone doing reader’s advisory in alternative sexuality/alternative relationship styles, or if you’re interested in learning more. Includes triads and Poly V relationships only1 .

  • Stacy London, Aging, and Style: Her Story – I’ve been a fan of Stacy London’s since I first saw her on “What Not to Wear”, though sometimes it felt like the rules passed on to contestants rigidly enforced a New York sense of style. London now admits that the style rules she put forth as a 32 year old aren’t sustainable once you reach a certain age, and I found that candour refreshing. I still want to perform (through a queer femme lens) but it’s a challenge when you’re managing chronic illnesses, thinning hair, and other signs of aging.

  • Rachel Kaadzi Ghansah’s Brief but Spectacular take on fearless black art and being true to yourself.

  • I often sing the “Woe is me, I’m eternally dateless” song2, so it was refreshing to read Allison P. Davis’ What I Learned Tindering My Way Across Europe. Maybe I should renew my passport and buy a Eurail pass.

Tweet of the Week


  1. Check this glossary of poly terms for more information – https://www.morethantwo.com/polyglossary.html 

  2. A song that takes on a melancholy, minor key when you’re a black woman – https://blog.okcupid.com/index.php/your-race-affects-whether-people-write-you-back/ 

Things I’ve Learned as a Manager

What Has Being A Manager Taught Me About Work?

  • Manage expectations, manage projects, but don’t manage time
    • Maker’s Schedule: fewer meetings, shorter meetings, more time for focused, uninterrupted work
    • Manager’s Schedule: for bosses. Highly structured, always know where you’re going next 1
  • Give people more responsibility, flexibility, and power
  • Stay out of the weeds. Less detail is better in most cases.
  • Create an environment where people can thrive
  • Always believe in your staff, especially when they don’t believe in themselves
  • My fundamental responsibility is to equip people with the tools they need to succeed.

What Has Being A Manager Taught Me About Myself?

  • I’m a better manager when my team feels empowered, listened to, and respected.
  • Managing people’s emotional frailties and personal problems will always be difficult for me, as I value privacy, and don’t want to meddle.
  • There is such a thing as being too aloof.
  • You will either learn to get over your own insecurities/imposter syndrome, or you will fail.
  • The line between too much process and too little is paper-thin: too much process and projects become mired in overhead. Too little, and people will lose their way.
  • Being a manager highlights the worst parts of my cynical, distrustful nature.
  • Being a manager highlights the best parts of my empathetic, ride-or-die nature.
  • I am happiest when I am leading — not managing — others.

Sunday Links

Shopping

Elizabeth Suzann Artist Dress

suzann-artist-dress

In One Size Regular and One Size Plus (though the plus only runs up to size 16). It’s rare that I wish I could sew/I wish I were thinner. This is one of those times. $255 USD.

Fluevog Cleo Mary Janes

fluevog-cleo

The lower heel version of my beloved purple and orange Zazas that I had to give up after knee surgery. My birthday’s coming up, and I’m thinking I should treat myself. $345 CAD.

Poppy Barley Chelsea Boot in Militaire

poppy-barley-chelsea-boot

If it’s too good to be true, it probably is. Poppy Barley is a Canadian (!) shoe manufacturer — do we call them cobblers or designers? — who makes handmade, fashionable, and comfortable flats, ankle boots, tall boots, and brogues in women’s sizes 5-12. They also make men’s shoes if that’s your thing. There’s a Poppy Barley pop-up boutique scheduled in Vancouver on September 8, and I’ll be going. $375 CAD.

Stalogy 365 Days Notebook – B5 Size

stalogy-365-notebook-interior

I’m obsessed with good stationery, and while my success with Bullet Journaling has been mixed, keeping a paper journal for longer entries has worked out pretty well. What I like about these notebooks is that you can date the pages by circling or highlighting the month/day at the top of the page, or you can leave them blank in the event that your entries cover more than one page. It doesn’t hurt that the paper is very similar to Tomoe River paper, which is notoriously thin, light, yet fountain pen friendly. $42 CAD at Wonderpens, but can be found cheaper on various Amazon sites and at JetPens.

Reading

I’m deeply skeptical of these pop-Christian ministries, perhaps more skeptical of traditional Christianity, even.

N.K. Jemisin and the politics of prose.

Reactionary movements can’t sustain themselves unless they find something new to catch and burn on. And when they keep using the same tactics over and over again, I don’t know that that’s sustainable.

Slim-hipped androgynes can take my stretch denim when they pry it off my ample backside and super-thick thighs.

Tweet of the Week

RIP Gene Wilder.